Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual. Miguel Venegas, and Andres Marcos Burriel.
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...
Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...

Noticia de California, y de su Conquesta Temporal, y Espiritual ...

Madrid: Viuda de Manuel Fernandez, 1757. First edition. Fine. Hardcover. Item #22099

Three volumes. Small 4tos. (24),240; (8),564; (8),436. First issue with p. II, 479 misnumbered 476. Contemporary vellum, yap edges, manuscript titles on the spines.


Four folding copperplate maps: Vol. 1 contains the Mapa de la California, y su Costa Oriental Nuevamente Descubierta, based on Padre Kino's revolutionary map. Vol. 3 contains three maps: Seno de California; Carta de la Mar del Sur; and Mapa de la America Septentl. etc.


The first map has a professional, nearly invisible, repair of a closed separation across the upper third of the image, no loss. Map number 4 has a neat nearly invisible repair of a closed marginal tear, no loss. Scattered light foxing; small marginal paper flaw on II, 449/450, n ot affecting the text; stamps of the Museo of Teneriffe on the second leaf of II, the third leaf of III, and a paper repair on the second leaf of III suggesting there was once a stamp there. No text is affected, Remains of string ties. Inner hinges of I and II expertly repaired. An altogether superior copy of this set, called by Cowan the"foundation of a library of Californiana."


Venegas' manuscript was written between 1734 and 1739. It went unpublished because the Spanish Crown did not want details of New Spain disseminated. But eventually another Jesuit, Padre Burriel, edited the manuscript and saw it published.


The large map in volume 1 is based on Kino's 1702 map. It is indeed revolutionary as it was the first attempt to end the notion that California was an island. Padre Consag confirmed KIno's findings in a 1746 expedition to the mouth of the Colorado.
As Tooley notes (p. 111), Kino's map was not generally accepted; it was not until Consag confirmed Kino's discovery that caused Ferdinand VII in 1747 to issue a royal decree: California is not an island.


The London edition, issued in 1758, was an abridgment of this work.


Not Arizona 100, but arguably should have been; Kino and his followers are treated in several other numbers of that reference.


Zamorano 80, No. 78. Cowan, p. 238; Howes V69; Palau 358387.

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Price: $12,500.00